image
label   
catalogno   
cover title   
composer   
conductor   
soloist   
concerto
chamber
orchestral
choral
instrumental
song
symphony
opera
Extra search options (only for concerto and instrumental)
piano
violin
cello
horn
flute
oboe
cemballo
clarinet
bassoon
guitar
harpichord
trumpet
recorder
organ
viola
baryton
double bass
harp
lira
gamba
saxophone
trombone
 image

Clean Record user of the Quality Service Vinyl Cleaner
and the Loricraft PRC6 professional record cleaner.


Background information on the development of the Vinyl Cleaner by Lourens Ouweltjes. Please visit Quality Service @ www.qsaudio.nl

As a manufacturer of cleaning and lubricating products, and also being a music lover, I noticed that there are several LP cleaning systems in the market, with relatively expensive cleaners, which do not work well or are inadvisable due to being toxic.

Many products contain isopropanol (IPA) which is harmful and, according to EEC regulations, should be indicated on the label. Sometimes even methanol is used. For the development of an LP cleaner we started listing the requirements the cleaner should meet.


IT SHOULD BE:

The last two requirements are very difficult to combine. If a record is moistened with a fluid, the entire surface appears wet, but microscopic examination would reveal that only a small upper part of the grooves is wettened.

Some formulas found on the internet or in audio magazines mention a photo additive to penetrate the grooves. This product works well on flat photo surfaces, but the requirement to deeply penetrate the grooves is only partly fulfilled.

In order to penetrate to the bottom of the LP groove a very low surface tension is needed. Even if the photo additive is used in a higher concentration, mpenetration is still too low. Raising the concentration of such an additive will also leave soapy material on the record which will dampen the contact between needle and groove, and thus have a sonic effect.

Fortunately, there are some (very expensive)effective industrial components available, but most non-professionals would find these too costly.






In the tests run with a manual washing machine and some vacuum machines, I experienced the neccesity of good hardware cooperating with good software. Testing was not easy because every record has its own unique history in the process of becoming dirty, making comparisons very difficult. Some ticks and pops appeared to be damage, not caused by dirt, but by the use of a cartridge run with a too low tracking force.

A study of the available components and the requirements outlined above leads to the following formulation:

This resulted in a product which works effectively. This can be seen when a drop of liquid is applied to the surface of the LP, which shows the product spreading into the grooves.

The pure ethanol causes the product to be classified as flammable. Flashpoint: 28 C.

Quality Service Vinyl Cleaner is developed as a universal LP cleaner. It can be applied in a manual bath system and in more sophisticated vacuum LP washing machines.

For directions for the use of the cleaner in vacuum machines: please consult the manual supplied with the machine. If you use a manual bath system, it is advised to filter the vinyl cleaner after 10 or 15 records, the cleaner can be re-used after filtration. After washing about 100 LPs (or 250 singles) the cleaning fluid becomes saturated with fatty components.

Warning:The Vinyl Cleaner will harm CDs, and acetate or shellac 78 rpm records.


Do not mix with other cleaners.